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Storage Rates

This page lists rates for all IT Services storage service offerings. Please note that the individual services are listed separately in the service catalog.

Service Monthly Additional Charges
File Storage $0.038 per GB  
Secure File Storage $0.038 per GB  
Server Storage (High Performance) $0.30  per GB

Dual port connectivity (one-time charge)

  • SAN: $700
  • NAS: $700
Server Storage (Standard Performance) $0.10 per GB

Dual port connectivity (one-time charge)

  • SAN: $700
  • NAS: $700

Storage Rate Definitions


  • File Storage: File Storage provides standard ways for individuals and groups to share files across intranets and the Internet. By using a remote file-access protocol that is compatible with the way applications already share data on local disks and network file servers, File Storage enables collaboration on the Internet.
  • Secure File Storage: Secure File Storage provides a way for faculty and staff to transmit and store Restricted and Confidential Data. It is for both Windows and Macintosh desktop and laptop computers. Faculty and staff who participate in the Secure File Storage service must have Stanford Whole Disk Encryption (SWDE) installed and encrypt their laptop or desktop computer. They must also use either the Stanford Virtual Private Network (VPN) or Stanford Network Access Control (SUNAC) while transmitting files. Individual and group accounts are available.
  • Server Storage (High Performance): Server Storage (High Performance) offers a better level of performance through faster disks and network.  Most services that require low latency will find the level of performance more than sufficient; examples include databases, virtualization farms, email and calendar.
  • Server Storage (Standard Performance): Server Storage (Standard) handles unstructured data, e.g. application related data, digital media and web content. Server Storage (Standard) uses the University's general-purpose public network. Storage devices in this group are significantly cheaper and meet the generic performance for block-level data storage requirements.


Last modified September 1, 2013